• Do Your Failures Define Your Success?

    The fact is everyone fails. Michael Jordan was cut from his high school basketball team, went home, locked himself in his room, and cried. As a child Albert Einstein’s grades were so poor his teacher encouraged him to leave school, telling him he would never amount to anything. Walt Disney was fired from a newspaper for lacking creativity. The Beatles were initially turned down by a recording company who said “we don’t like their sound, and guitar music is on the way out.”

    When we fail it’s critical that we view it as a learning experience. It’s natural to feel disbelief, fear and anger. But eventually acceptance will take over and we deal with the despair we are feeling. Jordan, Einstein, Disney, The Beatles – they all struggled through failure, but they also never let that failure stop them from reaching massive success.

    How do we overcome failure in sales in order to reach success? If a sales call doesn’t go well, take time to debrief the call in your head. Analyse the failure. It takes a lot of courage to take responsibility for what went wrong.

    • Did you ask all the in depth qualifying questions?
    • How well did you listen?
    • Where you well prepared?
    • Did you miss a step in the selling process?
    • What would you do differently next time?

    Gaining professional stature in any career is not a flawless exercise. Whether it’s athletes, producers or sales professionals, those overcome failure’s emotional turmoil are those who eventually achieve success.

    To make a difference in your life and the lives around you it demands you try and fail, and fix it, and move on and try again.

    Just remember: “Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It’s courage that counts.”

    We’re pulling for you.

    Anneli Thomson

    Anneli Thomson

    Anneli is an expert in sales culture and talent management. She is a keen champagne drinker and triathlon enthusiast. The UK Franchisee of the Year 2014.

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  • Pressure Selling: You’re Not Doing Yourself Any Favours

    Businessmen

    Let’s pretend you’ve decided you need some new furniture. You do some research on the kind of pieces you would like to purchase and head to the store to check out what they have to offer. The minute you walk in the door a sales person approaches you and asks what most sales people would: ‘Can I help you?’ Most likely you would respond as most buyers would with: ‘No thanks, I’m just looking.’

    Recently the Mail Online conducted a poll about the top ten ‘bugbears’ for Briton – number one on the list: Pressure Selling; and number three: Pushy Salespeople. It’s clear: the automatic reaction most of us have, whether we’re actually just browsing or on a mission for something specific, is to put up the defensive walls and protect ourselves from the sales person. It’s as if they aren’t just a sales person, but a trained killer hunting us down to mount our heads on their ‘wall of commission’ like a prized buck.

    Where does this defensiveness come from? At Sandler, we know it comes from years of bad sales people pushing prospects to buy for their reasons, not the customer’s reasons. Buyers have been conditioned to think of sales people, whether it’s business-to-consumer or business-to-business, as someone with an agenda. They don’t trust that the salesperson will listen to them instead of pressuring them into buying something they don’t really need.

    Two things often happen when a salesperson pressures a prospect into buying:

    1. They don’t make the sale and the prospect never comes back
    2. They make the sale, but eventually lose it to buyer’s remorse

    How do we separate ourselves from the pushy salespeople that Britons have ranked worse than dog messes on the sidewalk and potholes? The key: listening. Salespeople who are pressuring a prospect to buy are doing most of the talking. Often they spend the entire meeting trying to convince the prospect why their product or service is superior. The key to selling ethically and finding the best fit to your prospects needs is crafting and asking compelling question, and then staying quiet. Let the prospect speak, and actively listen. It seems so simple, but sadly according to Mail Online, not nearly enough salespeople are doing it.

    Differentiate yourself from the ‘traditional salespeople’, and don’t pressure your prospect.

    Anneli Thomson

    Anneli Thomson

    Anneli is an expert in sales culture and talent management. She is a keen champagne drinker and triathlon enthusiast. The UK Franchisee of the Year 2014.

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    Follow Me:
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