• Proud To Sponsor!

    “Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man.”

    Francis Bacon

    After the success of this years Chipping Norton Literary festival, we are so pleased to have been able to help buy abilify from india out in a small way.

    There are several things I do on the average working day – one is drive to Sandler HQ in Chipping Norton and the second is read.  I love books.  I grew up in a house where devouring novels was encouraged so it is still something I find great solace, comfort and enjoyment in.

    This is a very long way to explain why we jumped at the chance to sponsor the Chipping Norton Literary festival.  Yet, it is about more than my love of reading and Chippy – at Sandler, we are proud to sponsor the festival for 2 reasons:

    1. To inspire the next generation.  Bringing up those behind you and influencing young people should be fundamental to us all as well rounded business leaders.
    2. Encourage writers.  It doesn’t matter if you are a company owner, a high -powered executive or a postman, we all feel under appreciated at times in our work.  The literary festival is a super way to support new and established writers and let them know they’re doing a great job!

    Thank you to all who have given their time and resources to organising this fabulous festival and thank you for letting us sponsor an inspirational event!

    chip lit fest

    Blog Editor

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    Lisette Howlett edits the Sandler UK blog. If you have any questions or would like to submit a blog please contact her. Tel: 020 7484 5556 Email: Lisette.howlett@sandler.com

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  • “If you just set out to be liked, you would be prepared to compromise on anything at any time, and you would achieve nothing”

    Margret Thatcher 1925 – 2013

    Yesterday saw the passing of Britain’s longest serving Prime Minister.  Now, the House of Commons have been recalled to discuss her legacy.  Thatcher made great change in many areas of life – her fight against the trade unions and the buy cytotec in ghana promotion of the financial services sector to name a couple, but when it comes to leadership, what was her legacy here?

    She has been described as a leader who polarized people.  A leader of conviction.  She led from the front and embraced a debate.  She was strong-willed and could be sharp-tongued, but was always following her core values.

    On the other side, she was fiercely independent and single-minded, even when her views went against those of her advisors.  Can a leader really be effective when people are scared of you, or just plain don’t like you?

    I would argue that if your staff and those around you don’t like you – how can you inspire them to do their best?

    We need to take the very best of Margaret Thatcher’s behaviour – her strength of character, a will of steel and a dogged determination to continue at whatever the cost – we must temper it to be effective.  We need to soften the edges.  Allow people an alternative opinion, let them make their own mistakes, while always inspiring action and growth.

    To me Margaret Thatcher is best described as an aggressive lady with a big heart. Lead from the front with belief, coupled with forgiveness and compassion as your tool kit and her leadership legacy is yours.

    Anneli Thomson

    Anneli Thomson

    Anneli is an expert in sales culture and talent management. She is a keen champagne drinker and triathlon enthusiast. The UK Franchisee of the Year 2014.

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  • Inspire a Generation!

    In Sir Terrance Conran’s letter in the Times yesterday, he called for Britain to reflect upon its Olympic glory by getting Britain, “to make things again.” He highlighted that this would help the economy grow and, importantly, “would give our young people jobs.”

    I couldn’t agree more.  The Olympics brought out the best of British including British businesses. There has been lots of talk of creating a legacy for the next generation of athletes.  What about the next generation of business leaders?

    Young people are facing a crisis with unemployment still high and confidence low.  That’s why Sandler decided to help guide the next generation. Sales Explorers, for those seriously considering a career in sales.  Sales Explorers, for those who faced knocks in the past and kept buy crestor online uk going.  Find out more here.

     

     

    Blog Editor

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    Lisette Howlett edits the Sandler UK blog. If you have any questions or would like to submit a blog please contact her. Tel: 020 7484 5556 Email: Lisette.howlett@sandler.com

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  • David Cameron joins local leaders at IoD Oxfordshire lunch

    On Friday 6 July 2012 the Oxfordshire branch of the IoD held a lunch for members with Rt Hon David Cameron MP. Hosted at the Blue Boar, in the PM’s Oxfordshire constituency of Witney 24 IoD members attended what was a popular and informative lunch.

    David Cameron engaged his audience by talking about the important role business has to play in improving the economy and the generic klonopin names change that needs to happen to build a balanced economy, in which all the sectors – business, retail, and manufacturing – play a part. He also talked about the need for a diversified economy, across all sectors and regions, not one that is overly reliant on financial services and the City of London.

    Mike Collett, the newly appointed chair of the IoD Oxfordshire branch said, “it was a real honour to have David Cameron address our lunch guests and to answer their questions. He certainly gave us for food for thought on the macro and micro economic situation and reminded us that as business leaders we have the support of the government and that we really do have a key role to play in moving the economy forward. It was also encouraging to hear that as a local MP he understands the impact of local issues like the roads have on businesses in Oxfordshire.”

    Commenting on the event afterwards, David Cameron said, “I was delighted to join a small group of buy liquid arimidex online local business people recently at an Institute of Directors members’ lunch. We discussed a range of very important issues which affect businesses both locally and nationally and it was a very good opportunity for me to be able to reassure them that this Government is absolutely focused on doing everything possible to support enterprise and make Britain the best place in the world in which to start or grow a business.”

     

    Blog Editor

    Blog Editor

    Lisette Howlett edits the Sandler UK blog. If you have any questions or would like to submit a blog please contact her. Tel: 020 7484 5556 Email: Lisette.howlett@sandler.com

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  • Sales Explorers

    Blog Editor

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    Lisette Howlett edits the Sandler UK blog. If you have any questions or would like to submit a blog please contact her. Tel: 020 7484 5556 Email: Lisette.howlett@sandler.com

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  • Looking For A Job – What About Sales?

    With thousands of young people looking for a job in the United Kingdom, any employment initiative, no matter how small, is tobe welcomed.

    A case in point is Sandler Training, a sales, management and leadership training organisation, which is launching a UK wide competition for 18-24 year olds interested in kick-starting a career in sales.

    Up to 50 places are up for grabs in over 20 of the organisation’s UK centres, where interested young people will learn the skills needed to enter the sales sector and become successful in their quest for employment.

    Sales is a viable career option for unemployed youth

    of today, says Sandler Training. For in the UK alone, over two million people work in sales, a figure which represents 10% of the overall workforce.

    But employers have a clear criterion – ambitious, driven and personable individuals that can sell themselves and the company they represent.

    Sandler Training’s “sales explorers” training, worth a total of £400,000, includes an initial three months of Sandler’s weekly President’s Club – including the Sandler Sales Skills Foundations Programme. This takes the trainees through real life scenarios and best practices, such as how to develop a prospecting plan, setting goals and the importance of attitude in building a successful career.

    The buy flomax in india successful candidates will receive certifications and references. A further year’s weekly sales training and support will be offered to the candidates.

    Shaun Thomson, Sandler Training in the UK CEO, said, “The job market can feel like a brutal place – consecutive knock-backs can impact a young person’s confidence and motivation.

    “However, recession or not, businesses always need good salespeople. For today’s lost generation it provides them with an opportunity to be a master of their own destiny – they just need a helping hand to make it happen.

    “We all remember what it was like to hit the job market and we want to be able to give something back to people that just simply need the confidence to get the job they deserve – this support could be the first step of their journey to become business leaders of the future.”

    Interested? Looking for a job? Go to the Sandler Training web site to find the nearest participating training centre and online application zone.

    As part of the application process, candidates will be encouraged to think about “why a career in sales” would suit them.

    Published on Business Hemisphere by John Donaldson

    Blog Editor

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    Lisette Howlett edits the Sandler UK blog. If you have any questions or would like to submit a blog please contact her. Tel: 020 7484 5556 Email: Lisette.howlett@sandler.com

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  • Younger people offered training opportunity

    Published on the ‘institute of Leadership & Management.’

    June 20th 2012

    Younger people struggling to find a job may wish to participate in a new scheme buy cymbalta generic online created to boost employment opportunities for 18-24 year olds.

    Sales, management and leadership training body Sandler Training has today (20 June) announced the launch of a new UK-wide competition for individuals in this age group aiming to forge a career in sales.

    The group is making up to 50 training placements available in more than 20 of its centres across the country, which will provide people with the valuable skills and professional traits they need to be successful in this arena.

    Under the terms of the Sandler’s “sales explorers” programme – which lasts for three months – individuals will be taught through a series of real-life scenarios, such as planning ahead and setting achievable targets for the future.

    Those who complete the training successfully will then be awarded certificates, references and the offer of a further year’s worth http://buyambiencheap.com of training.

    Shaun Thomson, chief executive officer of Sandler, commented: “We all remember what it was like to hit the job market and we want to be able to give something back to people that just simply need the confidence to get the job they deserve.”

    By Sam Williams

    Blog Editor

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    Lisette Howlett edits the Sandler UK blog. If you have any questions or would like to submit a blog please contact her. Tel: 020 7484 5556 Email: Lisette.howlett@sandler.com

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  • Good sales people: Are they born or created?

    Ever overheard anyone say “ Mary is a born sales person”?

    Or perhaps you received a clumsy compliment, “you are a born sales person!” Or have you ever said “wow, they are a born salesperson?”

    I even once heard a candidate for a sales manager’s position tell the interviewer that they first got into sales because a teacher had told them that they were “a born sales person”.

    That was a mistake.

    The professional interviewers’ follow up questions quickly identified the candidate as an enthusiastic amateur.

    “ Why do people buy?” “how do they make decisions?” “ what is a prospecting plan?” “show me an example” “ How do you measure and monitor your effectiveness?” “ How do you hold yourself accountable?” “ How do you know when changes in the market require you to change your prospecting plan?” “ Do you have written goals?” “ where do you go to for advice when you get stuck?” “ give me examples” etc, etc.

    The “born” sales person’s enthusiastic and naïve grin soon gave way to confusion, then resistance, followed by defeat.

    Imagine visiting a surgeon, asking to hear about his qualifications, and having them tell you that “I’m a born surgeon. Ever since the first time I helped my Mum cut up a whole TESCO chicken, she told me I was a born surgeon”

    Imagine a hospital staffed with self-declared born surgeons. What sort of patient outcomes would the hospital get? Of course, thesurgeons, believing them selves to be born surgeons, backed up by the administration that hired them would probably find external reasons for the poor results. “ they buy levaquin 750 mg were incurable”, “we didn’t have access to the right drugs/equipment” etc.

    Back to the world of sales. A person who believes he or she is a born sales person can fool themselves and those around them into thinking they are a good sales person- temporarily. Then something changes. The market, the competition, the economy, the company, the pricing.  This is the moment of truth. They can either externalize the blame, or accept responsibility.

    The deluded amateur takes the easy path. It can’t be me. I’m a born sales person. So it must be the company web site, the lack of quality leads, prospects who just don’t get how good our product is, gatekeepers who wont let me through, people who wont return my call, time wasters who ask for quotes with no intention of buying, etc.

    A “good” sales person is eager to accept recognition when things go well, practiced at supplying logical reasons (excuses) when things go bad.

    A great sales person accepts responsibility. A great salesperson takes ownership of the challenge. A great sales person knows they have to work hard at honing their skills, strategies, and tactics. They understand that external factors may change, and it’s up to them to adapt. A great salesperson understands there is no such thing as a bad prospect, only a bad salesperson.

    Organizations that struggle to understand that great sales people are not born, often hire enthusiastic amateurs who have been deluded into thinking they must be a born salesperson because of a temporary winning streak.

    When the results are inconsistent, it’s often easier for the company to blame the market, the competitors and anything other than the sales and marketing team, because that would mean admitting that they don’t have a process for identifying great sales people. They settle for good enough for now. Upgrading to a great sales team

    I don’t care whether good sales people are born or created.

    I do know that great sales people have the self-awareness to accept responsibility. The ambition and drive to keep them open minded to learn. And, through their own efforts, evolve, learn and grow to ensure they get results.

    How do I know? I was a “good” sales person, …until I looked a little to closely at myself in the mirror.

    Further reading:-

    Talent Is Overrated: What Really Separates World-Class Performers from EverybodyElse  by Geoff Colvin
     Article in the Financial Times http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/9f5e50b4-750e-11e1-90d1-00144feab49a.html#axzz1rcqwfLSz
    Nigel Dunand

    Nigel Dunand

    Nigel Dunand runs Sandler Training in the Midlands based at the Innovation Centre in Longbridge.

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  • Business schools need to sell sales as a viable career option

    It is believed that half of all business and MBA graduates buy celebrex in mexico enter a sales-related role. But how prepared are they and, indeed, how effective are they in that role?…

    To read the rest of this article Featured in the Financial Times click HERE

    Blog Editor

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    Lisette Howlett edits the Sandler UK blog. If you have any questions or would like to submit a blog please contact her. Tel: 020 7484 5556 Email: Lisette.howlett@sandler.com

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  • The Next Generation – Part 2

    The wait is over. The eagerly anticipated 2nd part to Megan Mackeigan’s The Next Generation is with us! If you didn’t read part 1…… Maybe go back and refresh your memory first. Its not to be missed!


    As a Sandler Trainer I have become addicted to the work that we do. Anneli put it well when she said, “Watching my colleagues change through Sandler and its ethos, I gradually got more involved with the company. Every day I loved what I saw more and more, so have never looked back.” I feel the same. We have the privilege of helping people enjoy and be better in their careers. At Sandler we talk a great deal about being a “product of the product”, so by going to our Sandler conferences in the US three times a year, I have the opportunity to learn more and become better in my own career. It is a privilege I don’t take for granted.

    Anneli and I are in Sandler for the long haul. We have the belief that a profession in business development has exceptional rewards, and we know that we have to be dedicated, consistent and productive to reap the benefits of it. We both agree that we battle the reputation of our ‘Y Generation’ that has us lacking the ambition and commitment that the Boomers had when they were our age. The consensus has become that those born in the 80’s and onward have a feeling of entitlement to a lifestyle and income that we are not willing to work for.

    Anneli is inclined to agree that the perception of the ‘Y Generation’ in the workforce is not always a positive one. “Sometimes there is a perception of our generation that when they are job searching they become very picky but have little process to strategically find a position they will enjoy. Some may say that when they do have jobs they are unwilling to do the difficult behaviours, and often experience the employee mentality. The Y Generation was brought up in such a way that in some cases it is the culture of their being. They were taught there is no such thing as a ‘job for life’. How can our generation be expected to work hard if no one expects them to stay long term and is not willing to invest in their career success?”

    We both agree that while there may be some Y Generation individuals that fit this stereotype it is impossible to group them all together. Not all Y Generations are settling for jobs they’re not passionate about, working just hard enough not to get fired and feeling satisfied with maintaining the status quo. Just look at the number of young, successful entrepreneurs in Halifax. Look at groups like Fusion. Young, vibrant, motivated business people who are working hard to achieve their goals. Y Generation business leaders are emerging in markets from Halifax to London every day.

    Those in the Y Generation who break through the stereotypes know that to be successful, they must be confident but humble. They are willing to change and adapt. If they learned it one way, they understand that’s not always the best way for every situation. They are innovative and open to trying new approaches. They ask for help, and understand that no one rises to the top alone – success is a group buy famvir tablets effort. They manage their expectations. Do they have goals? Of course. Are they realistic? Yes. Smart Y Generations leaders know we’re not going to drive the Mercedes and have the corner office overnight. Your 20’s are for paying dues. It’s what most people do and the initial grunt work is a path to learning and achieving credibility and respect.

    If you’re a Y Generation looking to make a big change in your life or career I highly recommend reading The Big Leap by Gay Hendricks. It taught me to put success into perspective – take yourself to the next level, but don’t cruise past the steps along the way. Every small step is an experience that makes you better and keeps your feet on the ground. Live in a mindset of success – but define success carefully. For me it’s not a fancy car or lavish stuff – it’s getting better at what I do every day. It helped me understand that there is great success in my future if I am willing to work for it, and to enjoy the journey along the way.

    To those managers who have Y Generation business leaders generic cymbalta complaints on staff: you’re working with a new breed. These are technologically advanced, social media hungry, networking, money motivated machines. They want the rewards and will work for it, but you have to give them structure to achieve it. I don’t mean micro-managing, but full disclosure managing. A partnership built on trust, that isn’t just about supervising, but about mentorship, training, and coaching. You have got to understand what their personal goals are so you can help them get there and show them how the job is a means to that. We want to be a part of the bigger picture; you’ve got to let us know there is a place for us so we feel we belong.

    My hope is that companies will hire Y generation employees and encourage them to treat the company as if it was their own. Anneli and I both have a vested interest in our companies because we want to be a part of the succession plan. We want to continue with what was started. Would more Y generation employees develop a long term mentality if they embodied an entrepreneurial spirit? Could the culture of, “it’s good enough to stay” disappear if Y generation professionals felt like they had something significant to contribute, and were able to experience increased levels of success by working harder? Anneli and I think yes, but it has to start with the business owners showing their Y generation employees that they are a valued part or the company and there is opportunity for more – if they’re willing to work for it.

    Written by Megan Mackeigan and Jay Mackeigan.

    Blog Editor

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    Lisette Howlett edits the Sandler UK blog. If you have any questions or would like to submit a blog please contact her. Tel: 020 7484 5556 Email: Lisette.howlett@sandler.com

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