• Have your 2017 resolutions hit the rocks already? It’s not too late!

    I confess, sometimes I’ve been asked “How’s the ‘XYZ’ resolution going?” (fads include Clear Inbox or Bed by 10 etc.) and I’m forced to implement the “I’m OK” smile, declaring everything was going supremely well, easy, fantastic results already.

    Reality was that my resolve had gone down faster than Eeyore’s balloon in a firing range. Work crushed any semblance of control, change was consigned to history.

    Why is changing habits the traditional way so HARD?

    Let’s take a common example: “No more Chocolate”. This desire for change will be driven by some form of motivation e.g. “I want to look thinner”.

    This time we’re going to stick with it, excited about alternatives our motivation is high. We’re driven by pleasure (fitting new Christmas clobber) or pain (dentist, health) however ‘motivation’ gets exhausted over time.

    When motivation runs out, determined folk resort to willpower. But that’s a resource that gets used up too. Uni. of Albany research shows resisting repeated temptations is mentally draining. Like a muscle exhausted from overuse.

    Our brain is a high consumer of glucose. Tests found lower glucose levels in people who had to repeatedly exert self-control, sapping their willpower. Like a car stops with an empty tank.

    A day filled with things we don’t want to do drains our limited reserve of willpower, it’s genuinely hard work, tiring, underlined by survey results (Uni. of Scranton) showing just 8% of people setting habit changing goals achieve them.

    Rewire the brain to get good ideas back on track

    Everyone has a bad habit or two. Is it easy to stop them? For the more embedded habits the answer is ‘NO’! Wouldn’t it be rewarding to have that resilience applied to great habits instead?

    We mustn’t make it hard for ourselves by fighting entrenched habits. Form new habits by comforting our brains that little change is taking place. Try these tips:

    • Little StepsStart with boring goals. Our subconscious hates big change (Fear, Flight, Fight) creating resistance. Make 10 New Business Calls as your early target not 100.
    • Commit – Believe in your goals, don’t set any to please others
    • ‘Triggers’ – Any smoker will tell you how powerful Triggers are! After breakfast, 20 mins on LinkedIn? Visual triggers e.g. Car Keys next to Business Cards?
    • Preparation – Create call lists the day before. Fuel in car? Correct tools for the job?
    • Convenience – Clear clutter, ability to make noise if required.
    • Have Fun – Decrease resistance by increasing pleasure! Consequence or Reward with a partner?
    • Don’t break sequence – Visually keep goals In View. Mark daily achievements with a big cross, number in a box etc.

    Do something often enough, it becomes a habit. Probably how our bad habits started in the first place and look how robust they are!

    Change is hard, taking 66 days on average to develop a new habit

    The good news is, it may not too late to revisit the ‘wobbly’ ones!

  • Success is Permission to Fail

    Failure is part of the human condition.

    Despite this, we understand from childhood and as we enter the world of work that it is only when we succeed at something that we are rewarded with praise or personal gain. Yet failure is something to be celebrated and should not be feared or frowned upon. I would even go as far as to say that if you’re not failing then you’re missing out.

    I was reminded of this recently when listening to the story of Victorian engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel. In 2002, Brunel came second in a BBC public poll to determine the ‘100 Greatest Britons’.

    Amongst Brunel’s greatest accomplishments, (the Great Western Railway to name just one) were numerous and sometimes catastrophic disasters. With each of his designs, he sought audacious solutions to long-standing engineering issues and this is what made him one of the greatest figures of the Industrial Revolution. Brunel had an unrelenting determination to step outside his comfort zone, push boundaries and conquer personal failures.

    Business owners (and sales people) can learn a lot from the likes of Brunel. Typically we live our lives in one of two ways; we are either risk adverse in the way we do business or operate within our roles (often because we worry too much about perceived consequences) or we do take risks but when the risks don’t pay off, we look to apportion blame to others or cite external factors as the cause.

    If we are not failing, we are repeating the same patterns of ‘safe’ behaviour. When you passionately champion something that stretches you, of course, mistakes are bound to happen. Accept these mistakes and take personal responsibility for them, otherwise golden opportunities are wasted.

    If we are ambitious and want to create growth or change, then we must learn to fail and accept our part in the consequences constructively, in a way that doesn’t make us risk adverse.

    Learn to see failure as a tool to improve performance. It is not our successes that help us grow and enrich our lives; it is the lessons we take from our mistakes.

    Give yourself permission to fail and you’ll feel better for it.

    Andy McCreadie

    Andy McCreadie

    Andy McCreadie is a critically-acclaimed coach and facilitator who excels at identifying core sales and management challenges and implementing transformative growth strategies. Before setting up Sandler Training in 2007 in the South West, Andy spent six years as a strategy consultant for Accenture, selling and delivering high profile consulting projects to blue chip companies. He then worked in direct sales – in London and Sydney, managing business development teams across a wide range of industry sectors.

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  • Women in Leadership

    iwd_square

    International Woman’s Day.  Welcome.  What is it I hear you ask?

    International Women’s Day (IWD) has been observed since early 1900s.  It started in 1908 when 15,000 women marched through New York City demanding shorted hours, better pay and voting rights.  In 1913 Russian women observed their 1st IWD.  Nowadays IWD is celebrated with thousands of events held throughout the world with the aim to inspire women and celebrate their achievements.

    Here at Sandler we wanted to join in the fun with something that would make a difference.  Today we launch our Women in Leadership programme.  This fab new programe is designed to grow, help and develop two groups of people:

    1. Those entrepreneurial women who are already facing a leadership role daily but often worry that they are only just coping – they have lots of plates spinning and worry they might all crash down at some point
    2. Women next in line to leadership.. Whether its an executive not yet made director or an associate or key worker in line for partner, we all need to develop our leadership core because if we don’t, no one else will take the time to develop us and help make us the best we can be.

    Start today.  Embrace your inner leader – and if you need a hand to stop her running away again, give us a call.

    So make a difference today.  Make everyday  International Women’s Day .  Do your bit to ensure that the future for girls is bright, equal, safe and rewarding.

    For more info on IWD see www.internationwomensday.com

     

    Anneli Thomson

    Anneli Thomson

    Anneli is an expert in sales culture and talent management. She is a keen champagne drinker and triathlon enthusiast. The UK Franchisee of the Year 2014.

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  • Pursuit of a Passion

    I’ve always been into sports and was lucky to attend a school where rugby was a religion and athletics, cross country and judo were other passions. I continued these whilst at Nottingham University and during my studies in France. I then spent 10 years in the corporate world where my focus on my health was reduced to take- away meals and an underused gym membership.

    A lucky break then took my career to Australia where I discovered my greatest passion to date – surfing. Intertwined with my job as a Sales and Marketing Director, I spent two years travelling the East and South Coasts of Oz surfing classic ‘right hand point breaks.’ I felt like I was 15 years old again; waking before dawn to surf before work.

    On returning to the UK, I set up Sandler Training in the South West. I was working a 15 hour day trying to get my new business off to a fast start when I realised I had lost my work/life balance and it was affecting my performance. Many business owners and professionals sacrifice health and often family life too, in pursuit of their business goals. They spend their life trying to gain wealth and then spend their wealth trying to gain back their health. Whilst for some this may be possible, lost time with family can never be regained.

    I have spent the last five years trying to get the balance right, while successfully growing my business. Richard Branson once said “Enjoyment at works starts and ends in the same place as everything else; in good health.” Be clear on your business goals but also on your health and family goals. Then develop the personal effectiveness to achieve them all.

    Go conquer your worlds!

    Andy McCreadie

    Andy McCreadie

    Andy McCreadie is a critically-acclaimed coach and facilitator who excels at identifying core sales and management challenges and implementing transformative growth strategies. Before setting up Sandler Training in 2007 in the South West, Andy spent six years as a strategy consultant for Accenture, selling and delivering high profile consulting projects to blue chip companies. He then worked in direct sales – in London and Sydney, managing business development teams across a wide range of industry sectors.

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