• When Should We Respond to Request for Proposals (RFPs)?

    The RFP from a whale prospect lands in your in-box. What do you do next?

    Most salespeople get excited, tell their boss that all their hard work cosying up to this company’s middle management and procurement team has paid off. They’d spend a day or two reading through the tome that reminds them of War and Peace, written by an 8-year old lawyer. Then they’d get the team together to plan who was going to do what. Much resource would be thrown at meeting the unreasonable deadline set by the “prospect” … but not much actual thought.

    They wouldn’t ask some fundamentally important questions; questions to which answers are imperative to decide what we do next, because  NOT ALL RFPs ARE LEGITIMATE! In fact, most aren’t. Most are an attempt to get free consulting from vendors too scared, excited, lazy or stupid to check if the RFP is even real.

    Consider these questions…

    • How did we make the list for receiving this RFP?
    • How many RFPs were sent?
    • What do we know about the prospect’s history surrounding RFPs?
    • Do they have a preferred supplier list (PSL) and are we on it?
    • If not, do they always give the business to someone on the PSL?
    • If we decide to participate, what happens next?
    • What role, if any, will their incumbent supplier play?
    • Will the low bid be the one that wins?
    • What results is the prospect company hoping to achieve by implementing the contents of the RFP?
    • Why aren’t they doing it in-house?
    • Is the timescale realistic?
    • Do we understand what caused them to go to market with this RFP? DO we understand the different drivers and centres of dissatisfaction?
    • Do we have a sponsor, coach or advocate in the prospect company to whom we can submit a rough draft, have it critiqued to make sure we have identified their priorities and covered all the issues they consider most important?
    • Are they high enough in the company to be able to provide us with the answers we need or just the ones they are willing to give any vendor?
    • Should we involved our senior management?
    • Have we identified to whom the prospect’s decision-making committee already has allegiances by suing our personal networks, trawling through LinkedIn and the internet to see what connections they have to our competitors and the incumbent?
    • What is the likely cost of sale to participate in this bid, win or lose?
    • Is this even legitimate?
    • Can we win it?
    • Are there any conditions that we do not qualify against that will preclude us from winning this e.g not ISO9000 compliant, no sector experience and sector experience is a must have, we don’t have 3-years accounts, they want to use their T&Cs not ours, our non-negotiable payment terms are unacceptable to them?
    • Do we want to win it?
    • What opportunity cost will we incur if we plough time, money and resources into this bid and is there a better way to invest our scarce and valuable resources?
    • Is this RFP going to be profitable if we win it? By when?

    Once you have your questions clear in your mind, are you allowed to speak to someone, not in procurement or a technical buying capacity, at a high enough level to understand the business drivers behind this RFP invitation?

    Given that RFP responses are usually the second highest hidden cost in any selling organisation after wrong hires the killer question you need to answer for yourselves is:

    • What are our chances of winning it?
    • Should we participate in this RFP process?

    Take the emotion out of RFPs and never lift a finger until you have done your research and picked up the phone.

    A simple rule of thumb for management to eliminate wasted effort and falling into the free consulting trap is that selling the opportunity internally should be twice as hard as selling it to the prospect.

    Live by the principle that you should do less but better on purpose.

  • Frickin’ Elephants Help Effective Communication

    When it comes to good communication it’s not so much about sending the right message as it is getting the right response. The right message assumes you and the other person will respond in the same way. A person’s understanding shows up before you do, and that is the reality of the message you send. It’s not what you say; it’s what people hear. And, while you might not be able to control what people see or hear, you can do a better job trying to anticipate it.

    I heard a story about a grandpa helping his four-year-old grandson learn to read. The boy pointed to a picture in a zoo book and said, “Look, Grandpa! It’s a frickin’ elephant.” The grandpa took a deep breath and asked, “What did you call it?”

    His grandson repeated himself.

    “It’s a frickin’ elephant, Grandpa! It says so on the picture!”

    And, so it did. When the grandpa looked down at the picture, it read,

    “A F R I C A N Elephant.”

    It’s not what you say; It’s what people hear

    When looking at your marketing materials it’s important to ask serious questions about the message that’s being portrayed to those that will see  them.  Here’s 4 quick pointer questions for you to consider.

    • Does this support or compete with the intended experience for your audience?
    • Does this marketing material help accomplish the desired objective or not?
    • Does it have potential to attract or repel?
    • Does it add to or take away credibility?

    When it comes to your website or marketing material you only have 3 seconds to communicate that right message to your visitors, that’s less time than  it takes to read this sentence.

    What’s your message and how is it being heard?

    Do you think about what you might say will be taken by others and how it might affect them or do you just think about what you have to say and go and do it?

    I wonder what open and candid feedback you might get if you were to show your communications (whether it be your website, newsletters to clients or internal messages) to others before sending them? Would the feedback you get back match that of the desired goal of the communication?

    Is the communication you’re sending actually opening doors rather than closing them?

  • Why Change?

    How serious are you about growing your business, your profits and your services? Most businesses owners say they are doing ok so why do they need to change?

    Most business owners are great at delivering products/service but as they grow and develop the business they neglect the need for new skills, creating unseen inefficiencies and ‘grow themselves cash poor’.

    Why?

    We all have four devils within us: EGO, APATHY, IGNORANCE and FEAR.  One of these four prevents them from change, therefore managers become bottlenecks within their own company.

    Example…

    Just this week I spoke to a business owner, who on the surface is doing really well – and is just about to employ his 10th sales director! Unfortunately he hasn’t made any changes to the hiring or the on-boarding process.  He has not put in any systems or processes in place to check this decision so that he doesn’t make the same mistake for the 10th time.  Why? Because he would have had to do something differently and one of his devils stopped him CHANGING.

    Another example today, the owner of a business told me he just employed three BDMs. He has no on-boarding process, no framework to coach, train and mentor new staff. This is the first time he has hired BDMs. They have been there for 2 months and all they achieved is ‘getting to know the business’. With no targets, no direction and no accountability they will burn profits and quickly impact on cash flow.

    So what’s happening?

    Both these owners have a desire for success but have not committed to CHANGE. As a business owner it is your responsibility to educate yourself and your people. Managers who don’t commit to continuous education burn profits and don’t even realise until it’s too late.

    So what is commitment?

    Commitment is taking responsibility for where you are right now, reviewing the good, bad and the ugly and doing something about it. Commitment is asking yourself “what don’t I know”, what do I need to learn?” Recognise the devils within you and ask others for help.

    What’s stopping YOU from CHANGE?

    Peter Jones

    Peter Jones

    Peter Jones is Managing Director of Sandler Training in the East Midlands. Peter works with business owners and MD’s who want to increase their return on investment made in their sales team and business owners who need to improve their business development skills.

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  • Want Change? Put a Shark in the Tank!

    Bear with me on this as I have to explain…

    People hire me to create change, create sales growth, so I’m known as a sales turnaround specialist…

    Many people will know I’m hired when a company’s Sales Operating Model is stale and failing to deliver growth. Or when the cost of acquiring new business exceeds 10% ROI. You do measure this don’t you…?

    I typically work locally with small to medium sized businesses and occasionally enterprise sales organisations in the East Midlands.

    So why am I telling you this? Well, when I walk into an organisation, I won’t be rude but I’m not hired to make friends or pander to your sales people, I’m hired to make a difference and turn your sales opportunities into profitable business and I’m looking for a feeling, those gut feelings that help me identify what’s really going on.

    So what are the signs of a poor Sales Operating Model? There can be (not all the time) a huge amount of activity at the top of the sales pipeline, working on projects that may never close, spraying valuable information, giving away free consultancy in the hope that someone will buy from you, but in reality very little actually turns into new business.

    I see lot of unsold stock on the shelves. Often the marketing and sales department (the growth department) are under resourced and treated as a necessary evil, under funded, money is tight and the people are stretched. Other signs can be cash flow concerns and infighting between sales people and departments.

    This happens when you haven’t got a Shark in the tank!

    Here’s and example: back in the 70’s someone came up with the bright idea of catching live fish in the Pacific, putting them into a tanks and flying them across America so they could sell fresh fish to the fancy east coast restaurants and get 5-10 times the price.

    They converted planes into flying fish tanks for this purpose. However upon arrival lots of fish were found dead, floating upside down by the time they landed.

    The loss was killing the business so they consulted a marine biologist. The biologist looked at the problem and quickly said,  “That’s easy! Put a Shark in the tank. Nothing so large that it will do them harm, but large enough to put some tension in the tank.” And it worked!

    If you’re managing a Growth Department (Sales and Marketing team) you need a Shark…

    What do Sharks do?

    I believe Marketing and Sales should be as one. Marketing ideal clients but driven by a sales focus, not the typical fluffy stuff you see out there…

    Sharks have a Sales Operating Model (SOM) the rules of engagement are clearly set out, a common sales language is in place so everyone knows and understands. Sharks should make the internal sell twice as hard as the external sell, the salesperson has to demonstrate the project is profitable and feasible before the company takes on the new business. They can only do this by having a ‘cookie cutter’ – a systematic way of identifying and qualifying opportunities.

    You can’t and don’t want to do everything offered. A good sales team may present 20 projects all with varying degrees of profitability, resource and time requirements. However the organisation may only be able to resource 4 to 6 projects at a time. The organisation has to have a system to be able to weight the opportunity and one that free’s up the team to move quickly as time kills sales opportunities. The team needs to quickly identify unprofitable projects and pass these onto the competition instead.

    Good SOM’s enable the sales leaders to measure the cost of the sale at each stage of the selling process, especially when pursuing costly bid requests and adapting to changes in the market.

    Without a common language the organisation is exposed to ‘woolly’ information and undermines the whole system.

    As a sales leader your job is to make the best salespeople work on the best opportunities. If you fail to do this you will fail to generate the desired results.

    Shark’s bring clearly defined accountability that includes rewards and consequences, as salespeople easily lapse into bad habits.

    Blog written on this topic taken from this video by my mentor Marcus Cauchi and Nick Ayton.

    Peter Jones

    Peter Jones

    Peter Jones is Managing Director of Sandler Training in the East Midlands. Peter works with business owners and MD’s who want to increase their return on investment made in their sales team and business owners who need to improve their business development skills.

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  • Farewell Star of LinkedIn

    Maybe you hadn’t noticed the star on some LinkedIn profiles. And now it’s too late.

    Until 25 Feb, there’s a small star on your 1st degree connections, and other profiles under the photo in the top section of profiles on LinkedIn by the word relationship. Your 1st degree connections are automatically saved to your LinkedIn Contacts when you connect to them.

    Contacts in your email address books and other sources are also saved when you sync them.

    Why does it matter?

    That Star was particularly useful because you could save profiles that are not your connections by just clicking the Star icon in the top section of the profile under their photo. The word Relationship would appear next to the star for saved contacts.

    On 25 Feb that Star is disappearing. LinkedIn are “retiring” the Star and the Save to Contacts feature. You’ll still be able access all of the Contacts you’ve previously saved by going to your Connections list, choosing the Filter By Tag option, and selecting the Saved Contacts tag.

    So get a move on today if there’s anyone you want to track without paying.

    Why are they removing it?

    It was a really useful feature – which most people didn’t use. I’m not surprised that LinkedIn are removing it – they need to pay the bills. And that means encouraging us to use their premium services.

    What do we use instead?

    We recommend Sales Navigator – if you are doing any business development or sales. LinkedIn is a great tool – when you know what you are doing. And when you do you LinkedIn prospecting regularly. Just having a profile and connecting with people you meet is not a prospecting activity. It’s essential to moving LinkedIn prospects off line and qualify them by phone for face to face meeting with you to get payback for the monthly fees and the time you invest.

    You can learn more about making LinkedIn work for you in the book we wrote with LinkedIn – [ download your copy here]. You’ll get the practical steps for prospecting – which work really well with Sales Navigator.

    And if you want to find out why we train LinkedIn, Salesforce and other global blue chip companies as well as all sizes of businesses across the UK, sign up for one of our Executive Briefings across the UK here you can find details or our training centres here: http://www.uk.sandler.com/locator/?country=GB  

    Ermine Amies

    Ermine Amies

    Ermine Amies runs Sandler Training in East Anglia with monthly Master Classes in Norwich

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  • Patience Is a Virtue (Of Success)

    You will find that only a few people are willing to be patient.  However, putting off instant gratification until later in order to obtain bigger rewards is essential to achieving true success.

    Patience doesn’t necessarily mean attending to the delays that sometimes occur, which are often an invitation to procrastination. Avoiding commitment is not the way to achieve success but there are distinct differences between “I need more time,” and the notion that achieving lasting results require time.

    To be truly successful, we need to practice patience in all areas of our life, when it comes to business, negotiations, communications goals and even employee relationships.

    If we put off doing a thing and find ourselves going nowhere, we are sabotaging ourselves.  If we put off doing it but find that, with struggle and effort, we are slowly progressing toward the desired goal, we can congratulate ourselves on having demonstrated a true willingness to postpone gratification ― an enormous asset and an indispensable element in self-realisation and success.

    Training and development takes time and just like any other hard-earned discipline, we get better at being patient the more we practice it.

    Rewards are often related to the ability to endure necessary waiting.  Just think, to become a surgeon, lawyer, diplomat, or professional salesperson takes time and dedication. While working toward the goal, little or nothing is earned, and recognition for work done and energy output is minimal.  The rewards come later. This makes the reward that much more meaningful because work has been put in for the greater good of your success.

    Blog Editor

    Blog Editor

    Lisette Howlett edits the Sandler UK blog. If you have any questions or would like to submit a blog please contact her. Tel: 020 7484 5556 Email: Lisette.howlett@sandler.com

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  • Are you prospecting daily?

    When businesses start, it is often for the passion and skill of producing an end product or service that makes the clients life better.

    That skill is often built by years of training, practice and experience. That’s where a business five a day comes into play. Everything we do to promote our business is an action that we are monitoring for a result. There are broadly five activities we must regularly work on to promote our business.

    If we think of a fishing analogy, our five a day would typically look like:

    1. Marketing, putting your boat where the fish is.
    2. Advertising, A big sign on the boat, saying, “we have bait here!”
    3. The internet, Painting on the bottom of the boat, pictures of bait, with an invite, to interact on the subject.
    4. Networking, Meeting people who may be able to give you a fish, but you should be able to give them one too.
    5. Putting the bait on a hook and actually fishing.

    Marketing, Advertising and Internet, we often hand over to professionals and we aggressively wait for the phone to ring or our inbox to light up.

    Networking is building relationships and hoping that someone understands enough about your business to be able to occasionally throw you a bone while they go about their own business.

    Prospecting is where the serious work starts. Even Steve Jobs had to work the phone at the beginning. While all steps are part of a good business balance, the prospecting part is often used as the last resort to developing your business. I think a lot of it comes down to confidence. Are we doing the right thing? What happens if we get it wrong? What if the prospect rejects our advances? How will we feel when we are rejected? I know this is the case as these are the questions I asked myself. The phone that was easy to pick up to speak to people we know now becomes elephant in the room that is impossible to pick up to speak to strangers.

    However, if you understand that you are doing the right things. You can accept that failure during prospecting is just part of the journey to success. You then have the confidence to continue without feeling crushed.

    We at Sandler Training give you the tools to prospect in the right way, we help you to maintain a good attitude while doing it and then the skills to get a premium price for your premium service. I hold regular masterclasses to show you how to prospect, disqualify time wasters and tyre kickers and close deals at a higher profit than ever before.

    Let’s talk!

    Roy Johnson

    Roy Johnson

    For twenty seven years Roy Johnson worked globally where he held leadership positions in market leading industrial automation and communications companies. Having left corporate life in 2014 he started his own sales training and management consultancy. Typically, his clients include entrepreneurs, CEOs, start-ups, Sales Directors, MDs, Senior Partners and business owners. These are often people who went into business to follow their passion with a requirement to build a client base to make it successful. They are either looking to put a sales system with coherence and clarity in place and/or take the business to the next level. Roy helps them to develop a successful sales culture so that they can make tough sales decisions based on real data rather than instinct. Mob +44 (0)7867525868 Tel +44 (0)1782 518040

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  • How to differentiate your business (Part 2)

    Continuing on the theme of differentiation, here I explore three other important aspects that you may wish to consider when driving forward your differentiation approach.

    1. The Social Sales-scape

    The rise and rise of the social web has been a key factor to the need for businesses to truly examine how they differentiate themselves. Digital technologies and social networks have dramatically changed the roles of buyers and sellers, their cycles and how they interact. The features and benefits of a product or service can be quickly and easily debunked as not necessarily unique to one’s business in what is now an open access market. Indeed for many products and services the provision of comparator information has become a business in its own right.  This undermines the possibility of selling within these parameters, making price one of the only discernible differentiators.

    In today’s fast evolving buyers’ market, true differentiation needs to be found in new places. You need to get beneath the skin of your brand’s essence to connect with what truly makes your business different. This often comes down to sales; it can be how you run your business and your sales strategy, how you approach and sell to prospects, how well you equip your people to take your business forward and how you manage client relationship strategies. These all need to be structured and systemic as frequently they are what will set you apart from the crowd.

    Getting these strategies right is critical for businesses of all sizes. Businesses tend to invest too much time, resource and creativity in creating brand or product or service differentiation, despite a simpler, more elegant strategy that focuses on the organic, systemic way a business sells often being more beneficial.

    Indeed, product or service differentiation cannot really be achieved at the point of sale and seeking to do this can in fact make you appear more salesey and less attractive.  It requires a trust and understanding of you and your product that a buyer will not have (nor can they until they have worked with you, which in turn, requires them to buy)

    1. We’re all grown-ups here

    When it comes to differentiation, it’s essential to treat your customers like adults, and build the expectation that you should be treated like an adult.

    This sounds odd but an adult-to-adult relationship is critical to building engagement and trust. This is what will strengthen your position in the buyer-seller framework. We talk a lot about communication being at the heart of our relationships. What we forget is that, when it comes to differentiation, it’s about what you do, not what you say and I see businesses failing to recognise this time and time again. Delivering on your promise – at all times, without fail, that’s what drives customer trust, customer commitment and customer loyalty. That’s differentiation.

    Your customer has a role to play in this too. Let your customers know what’s expected of them in the process. A classic example here is when companies in the services industry pitch for new business. Very often, the pitch process becomes an extended programme of free consulting with no real return. By having the guts to draw the line under the process, making the rules of engagement clear with your prospect, you are setting yourself apart with buyers who have expectations of the norm. You are also saving your business a lot of time and money. In this way, the buyer and seller start to treat each other with equal business stature – as adults. Changing your behaviour and attitude by holding your nerve against pressure from buyers to devalue your business will be critical next year.

    1. Holding your nerve

    Economic uncertainty makes this a tough environment for businesses and the temptation is all too great to compete on price. We all know that in the longer-term, this isn’t sustainable for businesses looking to grow.

    Businesses need to have the guts, the courage, to remain true to themselves. Understanding their competitors, understanding their customers and understanding their own place in the market will help them map out their differentiation strategy. Communicate this right across your business to ensure your customers get a consistent, cohesive message. Creating a sense of ownership around your business’ authentic point of differentiation is critically important.

    Lisette Howlett

    For twenty years Lisette Howlett lived and worked in Europe, Asia and the USA where she held senior positions running global programmes in some of the world’s leading companies. Since leaving corporate life Lisette has been successfully running her own consultancy for 8 years. Typically her sales training clients include entrepreneurs, CEOs, start-ups, Sales Directors, MDs, Senior Partners and business owners – often these are people who don’t consider themselves as traditional sales people but are committed to growing their businesses and thus recognise the need to sell more effectively and more authentically. Visit her Huffington Post Blog Tel: 020 7484 5556

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  • How to differentiate your business

    As businesses continue through uncertain times, I thought I would look at how differentiation could be the key to your success.

    Has the word “differentiation” started to sound a little tired? If so, this is because it is both misused and over used.

    We need to pause and think about what differentiation actually means to businesses. In business, when we talk about differentiation we are talking about separating ourselves from our competitors. Ideally, we want to achieve two things by doing this. Firstly, to attract customers to buy from us, and secondly, to have them buy at our price. Working with businesses from a number of sectors, I find that they don’t always realise that a key purpose for striving for differentiation is to maintain their price point; as a result they often end up selling themselves short. This doesn’t look like real success to me.

    Differentiation should therefore not be seen as an end in itself but a means to an end, namely to sell on terms that make sense. Additionally we need to adapt our attempt to differentiate our businesses to today’s tough and increasingly cluttered marketplace.

    In a series of 2 blogs I have looked at the 5 things you need to consider when striving for that all important differentiation.

    1. Know your competitors

    Understanding your competitors is at the crux of differentiation – it’s only by doing this, that you can carve out your own market segment. However, this again requires a new way of thinking.

    Your competitor isn’t necessarily the shop next door. You need to think wider than this.  There are obvious competitors here such as similar products/services, geographies or employee pools. There are also the less obvious ones such as people who provide a very different solution but one that fixes the same problem, meets the same need as yours.  There is also the frequently overlooked ‘competitor’ which is the option to do nothing or to do it in-house.

    It is therefore important to think carefully about your competitors, know what they offer and know what you have to do differently to deliver a more attractive proposition for your customers.

    1. Authentic differentiation

    We hear a great deal about developing our unique selling proposition.  However, your USP, like differentiation, is a concept that can come across as trite and pedestrian in customer engagement as we all work so hard to prove how different we are from competitors and as a business. As brand-savvy consumers, expectation of differentiation had grown.

    There are a couple of things to consider when it comes to crystallising your USP or point of differentiation. I quote Steve Jobs here when I say, quite simply, “Brands are themselves”. You need to know – beyond making a profit – what the purpose of your business is and what you believe in it. There has to be that authentic core at the centre of what you do, rather than merely focusing on “What will sell more?” Customers today are sophisticated and discerning – they will see through the empty promise. Working with CEOs and business owners, I constantly encourage them to go back to the seed of their business.  To identify your business essence, get back in touch with yourself and your business to create that consistent and genuine proposition.

    Lisette Howlett

    For twenty years Lisette Howlett lived and worked in Europe, Asia and the USA where she held senior positions running global programmes in some of the world’s leading companies. Since leaving corporate life Lisette has been successfully running her own consultancy for 8 years. Typically her sales training clients include entrepreneurs, CEOs, start-ups, Sales Directors, MDs, Senior Partners and business owners – often these are people who don’t consider themselves as traditional sales people but are committed to growing their businesses and thus recognise the need to sell more effectively and more authentically. Visit her Huffington Post Blog Tel: 020 7484 5556

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  • Ever thought of how “Change” effects selling?

    Change

    This blog looks at change from the context of buying – and selling.

    Buying and selling can defined be in its broadest terms – selling a product or service or an idea. So it applies to a non-sales selling situation such as being persuaded to do something, support something and persuading someone to do something, support something etc.  It can also be applied to more traditionally defined sales situation – exchanging a product or service for money.

    Looking at buying.  Any purchase of any kind – thing, service or idea – requires a change.  Looking at some examples:

    • Buying new clothes or new shoes – they will feel different (and make you feel different) and thus are a change
    • Commissioning a new website – this requires a change in the look and feel of your online brand, new processes (if it includes different functionality), new opportunities
    • Investing in sales training – this requires you to let go of some of the things you do, change what you do and take some risks
    • Agreeing to do something different at work, or adopt a new work practice – this changes your actions or your beliefs

    It follows therefore that when we are selling we are actually facilitating a change.

    Looking at our change equation, change is a function of:

    • dissatisfaction with the present
    • a vision of the future
    • some first practical steps

    And to be personally motivated to make the change the sum of these needs to be equal to or greater to the cost or pain or effort of making the change

    Therefore before we can sell something to someone they need:

    • to be dissatisfied with what they have at the moment
    • a clear vision of the future – of where they could be, what could be happening
    • an idea of how to get there and confidence that it is possible – and then in turn, the actual route map
    • for the above to be equal to or great to the cost or pain or effort of making the change.

    If any of these elements are missing you will not make a sale.

    Taking an example of investing in sales training.  If I am happy enough with my client acquisition processes, even if I know at one level that I ‘should’ be bringing on more clients, unless something more compelling drives me (and creates dissatisfaction) I am not going to make a change.  Equally if I cannot imagine a future where I have more clients and enjoy some real benefits from this, I will not make the investment (in time, money and personal upheaval).  And finally if I do not think that you are the person to take me there I will not buy from you (i.e. I need to see my ‘first practical steps’).  And even if those things are in place, if I am not convinced that the cost – in terms of my time, my money or the demands placed on me – will be met or exceeded through the investment in training I will not buy.

    To sell effectively we need to facilitate our buyer in exploring the change equation for themselves and making a decision to change or not to change.

    Lisette Howlett

    For twenty years Lisette Howlett lived and worked in Europe, Asia and the USA where she held senior positions running global programmes in some of the world’s leading companies. Since leaving corporate life Lisette has been successfully running her own consultancy for 8 years. Typically her sales training clients include entrepreneurs, CEOs, start-ups, Sales Directors, MDs, Senior Partners and business owners – often these are people who don’t consider themselves as traditional sales people but are committed to growing their businesses and thus recognise the need to sell more effectively and more authentically. Visit her Huffington Post Blog Tel: 020 7484 5556

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